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In-house Access

Insight & Commentary for In-House Counsel Worldwide

Power of Brevity and Simplicity – A Valuable Lesson I Learned Over Time

Posted in Inside Health Law

Guest blogger: Kenneth A. Johnson is senior corporate counsel at Quest Diagnostics/AmeriPath. He is also incoming chair of the ACC Health Law Committee. He can be reached at kenny.a.johnson@QuestDiagnostics.com.

One of my favorite people in American History is Abraham Lincoln. You may be thinking, “What does Abraham Lincoln have to do with the ACC Health Law Committee?” But please read on — my diversion is brief and has a purpose!

Written in 1865 as the Civil War was concluding and just months before his assassination, Lincoln’s second inaugural address is one of the greatest and most powerful presidential speeches ever written. His speech is a masterful use of words delivered with humility and a tone evoking a message of reconciliation and peace. However, what often gets overlooked is that it is the second shortest inaugural address in US history at just 703 words. And even more amazing is 505 of the words in the speech — almost 75 percent — are one-syllable words! Continue Reading

Law Firm Cybersecurity

Posted in Litigation Shorts

Guest blogger: Evan Slavitt is general counsel at AVX Corporation. He is also the publications chair and cybersecurity subcommittee chair of the ACC Litigation Committee. He can be reached at evan.slavitt@avx.com.

Cybersecurity as an issue is now pervasive in the general media and in legal publications. Most of the time, the focus is on corporate cybersecurity — that is, the computer security of the companies that employ us. Naturally, that means most of the time in-house counsel focus on providing advice to our clients to assist them with legal compliance or responding to data breaches. Continue Reading

Combining Professional Career and Personal Passions: Q&A With Sam Shapiro of Vail Resorts Management Company

Posted in Career, Litigation Shorts

Guest blogger: Ed Paulis is vice president and assistant general counsel at Zurich North America Group. He is also chair of the ACC Litigation Committee. He can be reached at edward.paulis@zurichna.com.

The ACC Litigation Committee recently caught up with Sam Shapiro, Litigation Counsel with Vail Resorts Management Company, to discuss his career path in-house, recent trends on litigation faced by resort and entertainment companies, and his views on being an in-house litigator.

In his role as Litigation Counsel at Vail Resorts, Shapiro is responsible for all commercial and guest liability claims and lawsuits against all companies in the Vail Resorts organization. He personally litigates cases on behalf of the company in Colorado, as well as manages outside counsel who handle the defense of cases in Colorado and other jurisdictions. He also oversees the company’s claims department. Continue Reading

In-house Lawyers Volunteer at Conservatorship Clinic at Bet Tzedek Legal Services

Posted in Pro Bono & Diversity

Guest blogger: Michael Chang is vice president, legal and business affairs for Warner Bros. Consumer Products Inc.

On Thursday, November 12th, 23 lawyers who work at corporate law departments across Southern California volunteered their time at a clinic, providing basic assistance to individuals who wish to file for a probate conservatorship without a lawyer in order to help an adult who cannot care for himself or herself. The clinic was hosted by ACC Health Law Committee, ACC Southern California and Bet Tzedek Legal Services (Bet Tzedek). After receiving training from Diego Cartagena, associate vice president, pro bono at Bet Tzedek, the lawyer and law student volunteers devoted the rest of the afternoon meeting with clients at tables setup throughout Bet Tzedek. Continue Reading

Document Discovery and Data Privacy Laws

Posted in Litigation Shorts

Guest blogger: Evan Slavitt is general counsel at AVX Corporation. He is also the publications chair and cybersecurity subcommittee chair of the ACC Litigation Committee. He can be reached at evan.slavitt@avx.com.

Courts in the United States permit very broad discovery. Although there has been some movement toward restricting that discovery — especially for electronic discovery — the rules generally require litigants to produce large amounts of discovery. Further, because the rules don’t focus on corporate formalities, but instead on “control,” parents are generally required to produce documents held by all subsidiaries even if located outside the United States. This can result in direct conflict with data privacy laws outside the United States, as well as blocking statutes (laws specifically aimed at US discovery). Continue Reading